Month: October 2018

Deeper Dive into Single Member Limited Liability Companies

Deeper Dive into Single Member Limited Liability CompaniesEntity classification

LLCs with two or more members can be treated as a partnership or corporation for tax purposes. An LLC with one owner or single member limited liability company (SMLLC) can choose to be treated as a corporation or a “disregarded entity.”

The member of a SMLLC who wishes to be treated as corporation for tax purposes must file either Form 8832 to be treated as a ‘C’ Corporation or Form 2553 to elect classification as an ‘S’ Corporation. Where an individual does not file Forms 8832 or 2553 to elect to be treated as a corporation, the IRS will treat the LLC as a disregarded entity and it will be taxed as a sole proprietorship.

Tax treatment

By default, the IRS treats a SMLLC as a “disregarded entity.” This means the IRS will not look at a SMLLC as an entity separate from its sole member for the purpose of filing tax returns. Instead, similar to a sole proprietorship, the IRS will disregard the SMLLC and the member will report income and expenses and pay taxes for the business as part of his or her own personal tax return. Taxable income or loss generated by an operating business will be reported on Schedule C, while rental income will be reported on Schedule E. Since the ultimate responsibility for paying taxes on income generated by a SMLLC is passed through to the member, this way of taxing profits is called pass-through taxation.

Profits earned

As a disregarded entity, if the SMLLC has taxable profits for a given year, the sole member is required to pay taxes on that profit, regardless of whether the profits are actually distributed to the member. It is not relevant whether a member of a SMLLC leaves the profits in the business bank account or withdraws the money. Regardless, all income or loss are reported by the SMLLC owner for income taxation.

Example

Steve’s SMLLC, which owns rental real estate, earned $25,000 this year after expenses and depreciation. Steve decides that he doesn’t need the money and will leave the entire $25,000 in his business checking account to use next year. Steve will have to report and pay tax on the full $25,000.

SMLLC to partnership

There are instances when a SMLLC ceases to be a disregarded entity. One instance this is accomplished is through the addition of one or more new members to the limited liability company. The LLC’s tax reporting after an additional member is admitted no longer is reflected on Schedules C or E of the former sole member. The entity has become a multi-member limited liability company and must obtain an Employer Identification Number and file a partnership return.

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With Simon Filip, the Real Estate Tax Guy, on your side, you can focus on your real estate investments while he and his team take care of your accounting and taxes. Contact him at [email protected] or 201.655.7411 today.

Understanding the Mortgage Interest Deduction after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Understanding the Mortgage Interest Deduction after the Tax Cuts and Jobs ActThe TCJA modified the mortgage interest deduction for homeowners. Here’s what you need to know about the changes.

Home ownership has long been the American dream.  Mortgage loans have made it possible for the majority of American homeowners to afford buying a home. The government has encouraged home-ownership by offering tax breaks linked to mortgages, but recent changes in tax law changes how much a typical homeowner-taxpayer will benefit from the deductions. In 2018, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) changed the rules on how much mortgage interest can be deducted from taxable income.

Mortgage limits

Mortgage interest was one of the biggest deductions that tax law allowed. Unlike interest in borrowing for personal expenses, mortgage interest on a taxpayer’s residence can be deducted as an itemized deduction.

TCJA modified the mortgage interest deduction in several ways. The change that garnered the most attention was the reduction in the amount of interest that you’re allowed to deduct. Going forward, taxpayers will only be able to deduct interest on up to $750,000 of mortgage debt, down from $1 million under prior law.

The old $1 million mortgage limit is grandfathered in for existing mortgages, but if a taxpayer obtains a new mortgage post-TCJA, they will be subject to the lower limit. Taxpayers obtaining new mortgages exceeding $750,000are still eligible for a mortgage deduction, however, it will only be on the portion of interest attributable to the first $750,000 borrowing.

Home equity debt

Under old law, taxpayers could deduct interest on up to $100,000 of home equity debt. This allowed taxpayers to do whatever they wanted with the money, including paying down other types of debt (credit card, student loan, auto loans, etc.) or spending on things unrelated to their residence while still able to deduct the interest.

Tax reform under TCJA partially took away the ability to deduct interest on home equity debt. The interest is still tax deductible if the loan is used to buy, build, or improve your home and doesn’t bring the total outstanding mortgage above the new $750,000 limit. If the home equity debt was used for other purposes, it is no longer deductible. Unlike other changes, existing home equity loans were not grandfathered in.

Refinancing

It is important for taxpayers to understand how refinancing an existing mortgage will work for income tax purposes. When a taxpayer takes a mortgage to buy or build a home, it counts as home acquisition debt and is capped at $750,000. A mortgage for other purposes is treated as a home equity debt and now receives no interest deduction. When a taxpayer refinances a mortgage they originally counted as home acquisition debt, the refinanced mortgage will also count as home acquisition debt as long as it is in the same amount. If there is excess borrowed in the refinancing, the extra portion of cash pulled out will be treated as home equity debt, so that portion of the interest you pay won’t be deductible unless it is used to improve the home.

Key takeaways

  1. Interest payments are deductible on mortgage debt up to $750,000 (formerly $1 million).
  2. Deduction for other home equity debt (HELOCs and second mortgages eliminated (formerly $100,000).

With Simon Filip, the Real Estate Tax Guy, on your side, you can focus on your real estate investments while he and his team take care of your accounting and taxes. Contact him at [email protected] or 201.655.7411 today.